hope and fear pt 1

August 13, 2011

Hope and fear seem an odd pair.  Yet in God’s story of redemption they are parallel threads woven together.  In the sleepy, unassuming song O Little Town of Bethlehem we sing “Above the deep and dreamless sleep the silent stars go by.  Yet in thy dark streets shineth the everlasting Light; the hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight.”  Wait.  Why hopes, AND fears?  What are they anyway?  Why the connection?  And who cares?!  These are the questions I’m hoping to explore over the next several posts.  For those that heard them, some of these posts will be based on sermons I gave at SGCC.

So let’s begin with fear.  Seems like a logical place to start since it is probably the most primitive emotion we experience.  Other than it being a lot less warm I imagine babies cry when they’re born because they’re scared out of their minds.   That and they’ve yet to develop our highly-evolved capacity to mask our fears with golden calfs (more on that later).

Fear is hard to nail down as an emotion.  When we step back and think (a skill many of us neglect all too often) we often conclude that our fears are either misplaced or altogether illogical.   My two oldest sons are 7 and 6 at the time of this post and we were talking the other day about death – something our broader culture grossly neglects out of… hmmm, fear?   I’m glad that my boys feel the freedom to speak with me about this and it’s something I plan on encouraging as they grow older.  During the discussion Caleb says “well we don’t need to be afraid of death because then we get to be with God forever.”  Ah!  Proud moment as a dad.  To have the faith of a child…

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2 Responses to “hope and fear pt 1”


  1. […] part 1 here.  What is fear?  “A true fear of God is a beautiful thing.  It is worship, love and […]


  2. […] this post would be a gross understatement.  While I’ve written and spoke on the themes of hope and fear, or death and loss, nothing has brought me to the crucible of grief like the death of my dad. […]


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